The government of England is moving towards making cities greener to fight climate change. 130,000 trees are set to be planted across different towns, funded by a grant of £10m (around Php 660m) sponsored by the Urban Tree Challenge Fund. The grant will provide for the planting of the trees and their first three years of care.

Led by the Forestry Commission, the project is open to everyone. Michael Gove, the environment secretary of England, said that trees are very important in fighting the current climate crisis and that people should move fast. Trees absorb noise and carbon dioxide as well as reduces flood risk. Green spaces near populated areas are also proven to be beneficial to their wellbeing, said Sir Harry Studholme, chair of the Forestry Commission, which makes him look forward to the tree planting that will commence in autumn.

Now, people understand the importance of trees in making their communities better, said Paul Nolan, chair of England’s Community Forests and director of The Mersey Forest. 2018’s England’s government ‘tree champion’ awardee, Sir William Worsley, said that there are endless benefits of tree planting and that they are the lifeblood of the nation, so it is important to make sure that they are rooted, not only in the countryside, but also in urban areas.

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