Many people think that going vegan makes one healthier, and is also helpful to Mother Earth. However, this seems to be untrue. In fact, scientists have discussed that going vegan may not be wholly eco-friendly, especially in developing countries. This concept might also be a threat to livestock farmers as this makes them feel demonized by ‘meat is evil’ statements, said experts from the University of Edinburgh and Scotland’s Rural College.

Meat is vital to people’s diets as it completes one’s nutritional needs. It provides nutrients that completes the body’s full development, especially to the physical and mental state of the children.

Prof. Mike Coffey of Scotland’s Rural College said that jumping to a vegan diet is unnecessary and may even be harmful to the environment, adding that livestock farming helps boost biodiversity. Veganism is said to be one of the solutions to improve land use, but in other countries, it is not effective and would be inconsiderable to abstain from the livestock sector. Study shows that veganism leads to inefficient land use and doesn’t feed more people. There are different types of agricultural lands: some lands are for cultivating crops while others are suitable for animal production. For instance, there are certain lands where only grass and nothing else grows. Thus, decreasing the livestock sector and jumping to a vegan diet would lead to land waste and unused resources. 

Farmers and researchers are looking for ways to effectively lessen the world’s carbon footprint. In this case, it involves picking particular animals that can help reduce methane emissions. The counterargument was raised by Professor Andrea Wilson of Edinburgh University, who adds that that further research on veganism is also important to look into, and to not just focus on the aspect of livestock.

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