A lot of people drink coffee, particularly now, when coffee is one of the most globally preferred beverages. However, people often forget that coffee “beans” are actually seeds of a berry. Although coffee beans can be seen almost everywhere, it’s so seldom to see coffee berries.

A senior lecturer from the RMIT University in Australia, Tien Huynh, thought about the possibility that coffee drinkers are not the only people who failed to notice the coffee fruit, but also coffee growers themselves. Huynh finds this concerning because coffee farmers could actually find an opportunity to earn additional income from coffee berries.

Tien Huynh shared that in her home country of Vietnam, coffee is one of the main industries. However, the process produces a lot of waste. From the total production, about 50 percent of coffee berries are wasted and the actual coffee product from beans also produces waste as discarded coffee grounds.

As bioscience and biotechnology expert in skincare and wound healing, Huynh started experimenting with all parts of coffee fruits which could possibly benefit one’s health. From there, she found a useful application for it. It turns out that coffee fruits can potentially be used to heal skin conditions, inflammation, and even brain function.

If there is a possibility that Huynh’s idea would turn into reality, this is a great way to solve major problems in the coffee industry where underpaid coffee farmers can earn additional income since the coffee pulp is going to be more expensive than the bean. At the same time, it can reduce the amount of waste produced by the coffee industry.

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