Smoke from forest fires impacts the trees’ ability to grow at a maximum capacity. The same goes for cigarette smoke; there have been studies on how cigarettes affect the health of plants, especially when placed indoors. One study found that plants with 30-minute exposure to cigarette smoke in a day can make plants grow fewer leaves. This makes the leaves droop and dry out sooner, too. In that study, the plants were placed in a confined space with lit cigarettes, something that does not necessarily resemble a real smoker’s home.

Although research studies on its effects on plants are limited, significant amounts of smoke may be damaging, the same way it is for the human body. 

 

How plants react to cigarette smoke 

In another study, peppermint plants were exposed to cigarette smoke. And after two hours, the plants absorbed nicotine into their leaves and roots. A week later, half of the nicotine stayed in the plants.

This indicates that plants absorb toxins like nicotine. This also implies that plants could be a way to filter toxic indoor air and make it healthier for household members. 

However, despite some plants being able to hold onto nicotine and other toxins, too much smoke in a small space may cause detrimental effects to them as well. 

Therefore, if you are a gardener and also a smoker, it would be better to smoke outdoors or better yet, to stop using them to prevent health problems for you and your plants. 

 

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