From the parent plant or even from flower arrangements, one of the easiest ways to propagate roses is by rooting their cuttings in water. Water propagation for roses may take three to four weeks, but this method can reproduce a plant that’s closest to the parent plant. 

 

To propagate, cut the stem that’s about four to six inches long right below the node (the point where a leaf is attached to the stem). Make sure to cut a stem from a parent plant that’s healthy and free of pests and diseases using a knife or pruner. Pinch off the leaves below, but keep two to three leaves attached to the stem. Remove all flowers and buds, too. 

 

Next, fill a jar with lukewarm water and insert the rose cutting in. The lower part of the cutting soaked in water must have no leaves to prevent rot. Position the jar in bright, indirect light and replace the water every three to five days. 

 

Once the roots have grown from two to four inches long, the roses will likely be ready for transplanting. Poke holes at the bottom of your pot for drainage and fill it with good potting soil. Moisten the soil and plant the rooted cutting. Keep it in bright, indirect sunlight and water as frequently as needed. 

 

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