Trees are essential. We rely on them for food, fuel, medicine, raw materials, oxygen, as well as for their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. Trees protect us from storms and help prevent soil erosion. 

Trees also help humans find peace and inspiration in the beauty of nature. Most importantly, there wouldn’t be plants and animals without trees. 

However, a study warns that a third and a half of tree species in the wild are on the brink of extinction.

Botanic Gardens Conservation International reported that threatened tree species are twice as large as mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles combined.

Destruction of trees for farming, grazing, and logging are responsible for these losses. This is aggravated by global warming and its consequences. 

Another study revealed that although there is an increase in the global forest cover, more and more forests are being stripped bare.

It is crucial to shield and restore forests across the world. The indigenous communities must be given a voice in the discussion of this crisis for they better understand the ecosystem and the need for its rehabilitation and protection. Reassessment of the trees’ functions is also important; acknowledge the ability of mangroves or woodland to ease floods and reduce intense heat in urban areas.

Photo by Taryn Elliott from Pexels.

Planting diverse tree species must be prioritized rather than just banking on fast-growing trees or those that are invasive. Adjusting to the human interest is also beneficial. Trees that can be harvested may motivate more people to protect the land. 

Seed preservation should be the last resort because a seed bank cannot easily restore the life of a forest once it’s lost. 

Source link